The Good Forest
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The Good Forest

The Salzburgers, Success, and the Plan for Georgia

Karen Auman

Foreword by James F. Brooks

Title Details

Pages: 254

Illustrations: 4 b&w images

Trim size: 6.000in x 9.000in

Formats

Paperback

Pub Date: 06/01/2024

ISBN: 9-780-8203-6609-8

List Price: $24.95

eBook

Pub Date: 06/01/2024

ISBN: 9-780-8203-6612-8

List Price: $24.95

eBook

Pub Date: 06/01/2024

ISBN: 9-780-8203-6611-1

List Price: $24.95

Hardcover

Pub Date: 06/01/2024

ISBN: 9-780-8203-6610-4

List Price: $114.95

Subsidies and Partnerships

Published with the generous support of Carl and Sally Gable Fund for Southern Colonial American History

The Good Forest

The Salzburgers, Success, and the Plan for Georgia

Karen Auman

Foreword by James F. Brooks

How German immigrants change our understanding of successin Colonial Georgia

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Georgia, the last of Britain’s American mainland colonies, began with high aspirations to create a morally sound society based on small family farms with no enslaved workers. But those goals were not realized, and Georgia became a slave plantation society, following the Carolina model. This trajectory of failure is well known. But looking at the Salzburgers, who emigrated from Europe as part of the original plan, providesa very different story.

The Good Forest reveals the experiences of the Salzburger migrants who came to Georgia with the support of British and German philanthropy, where they achieved self-sufficiency in the Ebenezer settlement while following the Trustees’ plans. Because their settlement compriseda significant portion of Georgia’s early population, their experiences provide a corrective to our understanding of early Georgia and help reveal the possibilities in Atlantic colonization as they built a cohesive community.

The relative success of the Ebenezer settlement, furthermore, challenges the inherent environmental, cultural, and economic determinism that has dominated Georgia history. That well-worn narrative often implies (or even explicitly states) that only a slave-based plantation economy—as implemented after the Trustee era—could succeed. With this history, Auman illuminates the interwoven themes of Atlantic migrations, colonization, charity, and transatlantic religious networks.

A piece of scholarship that brings brand new stories to the reader interested in either religious history or early Georgia history. Karen Auman brings a richer treatment of daily life among this group than any previous work through her superb archival research.

—Noeleen McIlvenna, author of Early American Rebels: Pursuing Democracy from Maryland to Carolina

Focused on the relationship between the Trustees and the Georgia Salzburger/Ebenezer community, Karen Auman's research follows a distinctive line of inquiry that expands the scope of existing scholarship, while also making its own distinctive contribution.

—Russell Kleckley, editor of The Letters of Johann Martin Boltzius, Lutheran Pastor in Ebenezer, Georgia

About the Author/Editor

KAREN AUMAN is an assistant professor of history at Brigham Young University. She has published her research in Early American Studies. She is also a certified genealogist.